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T-Shirt Sales To Benefit Fire Department October 20, 2017

The Hershey Volunteer Fire Department will benefit from sales of a T-shirt featuring Station 48's tower.

A Hershey-based apparel company designed and screen-printed the heather red shirt, which features, in white ink, a badge-like logo incorporating the tower and the words "Forty-Eight, Since 1905." Made from a cotton/polyester blend, the shirts come in unisex sizes of small, medium, large, extra large, and 2XL.

The shirts can be purchased at stayapparel.com or by appointment at Station 48, 21 W. Caracas Ave., Hershey. Size 2XL is only available at the station. To make an appointment, readers may call the station at 717-533-2953.

All proceeds will benefit the fire department's capital campaign.

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Tsaplina To Present Program October 19, 2017

The Department of Humanities at the Penn State College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, will host a presentation on Friday, Nov. 3, at noon in Room C3621 on the third floor of the College of Medicine, above the George T. Harrell Library.

Marina Tsaplina, an artist, patient advocate, and Kienle Scholar in Medical Humanities, will present "Moral Imagination in Chronic Illness: Creativity, Risk, Illness as Teacher, Embracing Complexity, and the Unknown."

She will perform her theatrical piece "The Invisible Elephant," which explores negative effects of losing a part of oneself to diabetes. The performance will be followed by a 30-minute facilitated discussion aimed to help health care providers working in chronic illness focus on the therapeutic exchange in medicine.

The event is free and open to the public. No preregistration is required. For more information, readers may contact Claire de Boer at cdeboer@pennstatehealth.psu.edu or call the Department of Humanities at 717-531-8778.

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Health Center Posts Programs October 18, 2017

Byrnes Health Education Center, with locations at 515 S. George St., York, and inside The Candy Factory at the rear of 342 N. Queen St., Lancaster, will offer several programs. Unless otherwise noted, there is a per-person cost to attend. For more information or to register, readers may call 717-848-3064 or visit Byrneshec.org.

"Girls and Moms" will be offered in Lancaster on Tuesday, Nov. 7, and in York on Tuesday, Nov. 21, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. each day. The program for moms and their daughters ages 9 to 12, led by a health educator, will focus on puberty and the natural changes that occur during adolescence.

"The Talk 101" will be offered in York on Nov. 7 at 6:30 p.m. The two-hour presentation, for adults only, is designed to give parents support in discussing the subject of human development with their child.

"Puberty Programs for Special Learners" have been slated in York, with programming for boys on Tuesday, Nov. 28, and programming for girls on Wednesday, Nov. 29. Each program will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. The programs are designed for students with autism, Down syndrome, learning disabilities, and developmental delays and will be taught by experienced special education teachers. Adults must attend with their child.

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Pappus House Seeks Volunteers October 18, 2017

Pappus House, a community end-of-life home, is seeking volunteers as plans proceed for a fall opening. A wide variety of opportunities is available, including lawn and garden care, cookie baking, and holding bedside vigils.

Volunteer information sessions will be offered at Pappus House, 253 Cherry St., York (Spry). The no-obligation sessions will take place on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 9 to 10:30 a.m. and Tuesday, Nov. 14, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Prospective volunteers are asked to call 717-893-5310 to register in advance.

Pappus House is an independent, free-standing residence that will welcome people who are nearing the end of life and are under hospice care. Additional information is available at www.pappushouse.org.

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Bereavement Group To Meet October 18, 2017

The Pastoral Care Department at Geisinger Holy Spirit, 503 N. 21st St., Camp Hill, will offer a six-week bereavement support group that will be held in the pastoral care consultation room. The group will meet Wednesdays, Oct. 25 through Nov. 29, with two sessions offered each day. An afternoon session will be offered from 1 to 2:30 p.m., and an evening session will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Both sessions will focus on the same topic, so participants can choose either time to attend.

The group is open to anyone experiencing grief after the loss of a loved one. Each week's focus will assist participants in understanding how to cope with grief and how to develop the skills necessary to turn mourning into memories. Presenters will include Sister Margaret Washington, director of pastoral care services at Geisinger Holy Spirit, and Sister Ann Marie Marabella, pastoral care associate.

Participation is free, but registration is requested. To register, readers may call 717-763-2118 or 717-972-4255.

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Wellness Programs Set By Hospital October 17, 2017

The Wellness Center of WellSpan Ephrata Community Hospital will host a variety of wellness programs. To register for any program, readers may call the health center at 717-721-8790. There is a cost to participate, unless noted otherwise.

A grocery store tour will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 23, at Yoder's Country Market, 14 S. Tower Road, New Holland. A dietitian will lead the tour, providing information on food labels and comparison shopping.

Safesitter Training will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 28, at the WellSpan Cocalico Health Center. Designed for youths ages 11 to 14, the class will teach baby-sitting skills, injury prevention, cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques, and other skills.

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Health Tips Posted October 17, 2017

Keeping the whole family healthy can be as easy as A-B-C. The American Heart Association and Penn State Children's Hospital offer several tips for helping children to be healthy.

A - Add color, whole grains, and lean protein. An easy first step to eating healthy is to include colorful fruits and vegetables at every meal and snack. A variety of colors can make these healthy foods more appealing to children. Making sandwiches with whole grain bread instead of white bread will add protein, fiber, and other nutrients. Lean proteins like chicken, fish, and beans can give children the energy they need to power through their day at school without extra saturated fat to slow them down.

B - Be an example. Children's eating habits are influenced by what they see at home. Adults should review the American Heart Association's diet and lifestyle recommendations for children and adults to ensure they are offering appropriate nutritional guidance for their children and modeling healthy eating themselves.

C - Cut the sugar and sodium. Saying goodbye to sugar-sweetened beverages and excess sodium found in processed foods reduces risk for obesity and high blood pressure, even in children. Fruit juices with no added sugar and fruit-infused water are refreshing alternatives to sugary juice drinks and soda. Parents are encouraged to look for low or no sodium added breads, meats, soups, sauces, and condiments and reduce consumption of cheese and savory, salty snacks.

For the second year in a row, Penn State Children's Hospital and the American Heart Association are teaming up to encourage schools, students, and families throughout central Pennsylvania to take youth health to heart. Nearly 85,000 students at schools that participate in the American Heart Association's Jump Rope for Heart or Hoops for Heart programs throughout Berks, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York counties will receive exclusive health education resources from physicians and health experts at Penn State Children's Hospital. Students at participating schools will have the opportunity to learn Hands-Only CPR thanks to the donation of the American Heart Association's CPR Anytime kits, enter the Penn State Healthy Community essay contest and art contest, and receive fun booklets and activities to encourage healthy eating.

Today, about one in three American children and teenagers is overweight or obese, nearly triple the rate seen in the 1960s. The rise of obesity in childhood can cause a broad range of health problems that previously were not seen until adulthood, such as high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, and elevated blood cholesterol levels.

Excess weight at a young age has also been linked to earlier death rates in adulthood. The healthiest way to help children achieve a healthy weight is with gradual, permanent changes in eating habits, and physical activity that are shared by the entire family.

For more information on the American Heart Association's children-focused programs and resources, including healthy activities and child-friendly recipes, readers may visit www.heart.org/kids.

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Club Plans Health Screening Event October 16, 2017

The Manheim Lions Club will offer health screenings performed by a local company on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 7 to 9:30 a.m. at St. Paul's United Church of Christ, 50 N. Main St., Manheim. The screenings, which are designed to find current or potential health problems, include tests for anemia, diabetes, heart disease, gout, and liver and kidney diseases. They also include Complete Blood Count (CBC), HDL (good cholesterol), and LDL (bad cholesterol), as well as a health lifestyle evaluation. Optional tests, which may be added for additional fees, will include prostate-specific antigen for males, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and vitamin D.

Individuals must not eat or drink for 10 hours before testing, but they may have water and medication. There is a fee for the screenings.

To preregister, call 800-776-6342 on Mondays through Fridays between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m.

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Teal Pumpkins Mean Allergy Alternatives October 16, 2017

Northwest EMS Joins Trick-Or-Treat Outreach

For children with food allergies, trick-or-treating can often lose its luster. That is why Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) launched a national effort for Halloween called the Teal Pumpkin Project, an initiative designed to offer options for youths with allergies and for children whose parents who may not want them to be overloaded with sugar.

Northwest Emergency Medical Services (EMS) will be participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project during countywide trick-or-treat hours from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 31. Families are invited to stop in at the stations located at 60 W. Colebrook St., Manheim, and 380 W. Bainbridge St., Elizabethtown, to meet emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics and receive non-candy treats. All are welcome.

Northwest EMS community outreach manager Lori Shenk explained that FARE's mission is to help make sure all children will come home from trick-or-treating with something they can enjoy. "The key is to raise awareness," Shenk said.

Teal pumpkins are already set up outside of each station to indicate participation in the Teal Pumpkin Project, and Shenk encourages area residents to consider taking part in the initiative at their own homes. "Anybody can do the Teal Pumpkin Project," Shenk noted. By displaying a teal-painted pumpkin on Halloween, homeowners are saying that they will offer non-candy treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, to trick-or-treaters. "Lots of households give non-candy items anyway, but the pumpkins are a way for people to know for sure before they go to a house," said Shenk.

Thanks to donations from several area businesses, Northwest EMS will have a free coloring book and piggy bank for each trick-or-treater while supplies last. Each child may also select a few prize items from a large cauldron that will be filled with things like whistles, slime, sticky fingers, and other gadgets and toys. "We had a lot of support from the businesses," Shenk said, noting that Bainbridge farmer Ben Burkholder donated the pumpkins and straw that have been used to decorate the station porches.

Shenk also gave teal pumpkins to 25 local businesses to display during October in hopes of getting the word out to more people about what the project is and the fact that the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations will be open to trick-or-treaters. "I have had a lot of feedback from the businesses saying that people are asking about the pumpkins," Shenk shared. "We hope to do this every year on Trick or Treat, so you'll see pumpkins at our stations next year, too."

Northwest EMS serves more than 55,000 residents in 15 municipalities in Lancaster, Lebanon, and Dauphin counties, said Shenk. In addition to the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations, Northwest EMS operates stations in the East Donegal Township municipal building and the Brickerville Fire Department.

According to Shenk, Northwest EMS prioritizes community outreach by intentionally partnering with other groups that provide education, prevention, and wellness services. Aside from the Teal Pumpkin Project, some of the organization's other education partnerships include Cribs For Kids safe sleep education in partnership with Penn State Children's Hospital; Farm and Home Safety Education with Lancaster General Health Trauma Services and Penn State Extension Services; Concussion Awareness and Education with the American Trauma Society and PA Safe Kids; CPR, Hands-Only CPR, and first aid with the American Heart Association; Toys for Tots collection with the United States Marine Corps Reserve; Teen Safe Driving and Distracted Driving education with local emergency response agencies; and an annual food bank collection with local food banks.

To learn more, readers may call Shenk at 717-371-8282 or visit www.nwems86.org.

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Teal Pumpkins Mean Allergy Alternatives October 13, 2017

Northwest EMS Joins Trick-Or-Treat Outreach

For children with food allergies, trick-or-treating can often lose its luster. That is why Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) launched a national effort for Halloween called the Teal Pumpkin Project, an initiative designed to offer options for youths with allergies and for children whose parents who may not want them to be overloaded with sugar.

Northwest Emergency Medical Services (EMS) will be participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project during countywide trick-or-treat hours from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 31. Families are invited to stop in at the stations located at 60 W. Colebrook St., Manheim, and 380 W. Bainbridge St., Elizabethtown, to meet emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics and receive non-candy treats. All are welcome.

Northwest EMS community outreach manager Lori Shenk explained that FARE's mission is to help make sure all children will come home from trick-or-treating with something they can enjoy. "The key is to raise awareness," Shenk said.

Teal pumpkins are already set up outside of each station to indicate participation in the Teal Pumpkin Project, and Shenk encourages area residents to consider taking part in the initiative at their own homes. "Anybody can do the Teal Pumpkin Project," Shenk noted. By displaying a teal-painted pumpkin on Halloween, homeowners are saying that they will offer non-candy treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, to trick-or-treaters. "Lots of households give non-candy items anyway, but the pumpkins are a way for people to know for sure before they go to a house," said Shenk.

Thanks to donations from several area businesses, Northwest EMS will have a free coloring book and piggy bank for each trick-or-treater while supplies last. Each child may also select a few prize items from a large cauldron that will be filled with things like whistles, slime, sticky fingers, and other gadgets and toys. "We had a lot of support from the businesses," Shenk said, noting that Bainbridge farmer Ben Burkholder donated the pumpkins and straw that have been used to decorate the station porches.

Shenk also gave teal pumpkins to 25 local businesses to display during October in hopes of getting the word out to more people about what the project is and the fact that the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations will be open to trick-or-treaters. "I have had a lot of feedback from the businesses saying that people are asking about the pumpkins," Shenk shared. "We hope to do this every year on trick-or-treat, so you'll see pumpkins at our stations next year, too."

Northwest EMS serves more than 55,000 residents in 15 municipalities in Lancaster, Lebanon, and Dauphin counties, said Shenk. In addition to the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations, Northwest EMS operates stations in the East Donegal Township municipal building and the Brickerville Fire Department.

According to Shenk, Northwest EMS prioritizes community outreach by intentionally partnering with other groups that provide education, prevention, and wellness services. Aside from the Teal Pumpkin Project, some of the organization's other education partnerships include Cribs For Kids safe sleep education in partnership with Penn State Children's Hospital; Farm and Home Safety Education with Lancaster General Health Trauma Services and Penn State Extension Services; Concussion Awareness and Education with the American Trauma Society and PA Safe Kids; CPR, Hands-Only CPR, and first-aid with the American Heart Association; Toys for Tots collection with the United States Marine Corps Reserve; Teen Safe Driving and Distracted Driving education with local emergency response agencies; and an annual food bank collection with local food banks.

To learn more, readers may call Shenk at 717-371-8282 or visit www.nwems86.org.

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Program To Focus On Stroke Recognition October 13, 2017

The Milanof-Schock Library, 1184 Anderson Ferry Road, Mount Joy, will hold a Lifelong Learners program on Monday, Oct. 23, at 10:30 a.m. The program will be "Stroke Recognition and Treatment: What's the Rush?"

Kathy Morrison, the Stroke Program manager for Penn State Hershey Medical Center, will provide information about the increasing incidence of stroke in young adults and why this is occurring. She will also show us the simple way to recognize stroke symptoms, discuss available treatment options, and more.

Morrison has more than 30 years of experience with various roles in nursing care and program management. Her published works have appeared in nursing journals and neuroscience course curricula. She has authored two books in support of nurses caring for stroke patients: "Fast Facts for Stroke Care Nursing" and "Stroke Certification Guide for Registered Nurses." She is a certified neuroscience nurse, a certified stroke nurse, and a Fellow of the American Heart Association. She and her husband, John, live in Mount Joy.

For more information or to register, readers may call the library at 717-653-1510 or visit www.mslibrary.org.

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Group Slates Educational Series October 12, 2017

Health by Choice Education and Research (HBCER) has announced its fall educational seminars. The sessions will be held on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Lancaster Farm and Home Center, 1383 Arcadia Road, Lancaster.

The Integrative Healthcare (IH) seminars are focused on combining conventional medicine (what is recognized as the current medical model practiced in hospitals and clinics) to therapies that fall under "alternative," natural methods, and personal coaching systems.

IH provides the opportunity for patients to partner with caregivers and coaches in therapeutic and educational environments, which may also empower them to take charge of their health.

Sessions are open to the public for a minimum donation. Attendees will receive a binder with action items they can follow each month based on that month's topic. Seminars will act as a monthly check in to keep regular attendees on their personal path to wellness.

To view past sessions, readers may visit http://hbcer.org/events under Recent Posts. For more information on HBCER, readers may contact Jen Gehl at jen@hbcer.com.

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Lifesaving Skills Classes Posted October 12, 2017

WellSpan Ephrata Community Hospital will offer classes in lifesaving skills. All classes will be held at WellSpan Cocalico Health Center, 63 W. Church St., Stevens. There is a cost for each course. Registration is required by calling 717-721-8790.

Basic Life Support - CPR class will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 16. This course will cover adult and pediatric CPR, two-rescuer scenarios, and use of a bag mask. Foreign body airway obstruction and use of an automated external defibrillation (AED) will also be included.

Heartsaver First Aid - Pediatric class will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 20. The course is designed to meet the requirements of childcare workers and/or emergency response teams. Students will learn skills such as discovering the problem, stopping bleeding, applying bandages, and using an epinephrine pen.

Heartsaver Adult, Child and Infant with AED Training class will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 23. The class will teach CPR and relief of choking for adults, children, and infants. Instruction on the use of an AED is included.

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York Regional EMS Earns Award October 11, 2017

York Regional Emergency Medical Services (EMS) has received the American Heart Association's Mission: Lifeline EMS Silver Award for implementing quality improvement measures for the treatment of patients who experience severe heart attacks. Mission: Lifeline seeks to save lives by closing the gaps that separate these patients from timely access to appropriate treatments. Mission: Lifeline's EMS recognition program recognizes emergency medical services for their efforts in improving systems of care and improving the quality of life for these patients.

EMS providers are vital to the success of Mission: Lifeline. They can help determine if a heart attack has occurred. They also follow protocols derived from American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines. These correct tools, training, and practices allow EMS providers to rapidly identify suspected heart attack patients, promptly notify the medical center, and trigger an early response from the awaiting hospital personnel.

Agencies that receive the Mission: Lifeline Silver award have demonstrated at least 75 percent compliance for each required achievement measure for one year. Since they often are the first medical point of contact, they can shave precious minutes of life-saving treatment time by activating the emergency response system that alerts hospitals.

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Holiday Travel Tips Shared October 11, 2017

For many people, no holiday season is complete without traveling. While traveling might not be as fun a holiday tradition as decking the halls or exchanging gifts with loved ones, there are ways for travelers to make their Christmastime excursions more enjoyable and affordable.

According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 91 percent of holiday travel is done by personal vehicle, such as a car. College students driving home for semester holiday breaks can invite fellow students heading to the same area to share a ride home. Traveling in pairs or groups can make long trips less monotonous and more affordable, as drivers and their passengers can split the cost of fuel and tolls. People can offer to pick up relatives who live along the way to their destinations, so no one has to drive unnecessarily.

Travelers taking to the air or railways for their holiday traveling should try to book their plans as early as possible. The earlier travelers try to book, the more likely they are to get a favorable itinerary. Travel experts vary with regard to when is the best time to book a flight, but travelers who try to book early and are willing to book indirect flights might find the most affordable deals, regardless of how far away from their desired travel date they book their trips.

Drivers can save time and money by packing their own meals when traveling for the holidays. Rest stop eateries tend to be overcrowded during the busy holiday traveling season, and such restaurants may not provide many choices for health-conscious travelers. Bringing along their own meals allows drivers to adhere to their personal diets and eat foods that will not make them drowsy on the road. Drivers can simply eat in the car during stops to assuage hunger.

Traveling during off-peak hours is recommended. Drivers who can muster the energy to begin their trips before sunrise can get a head start on the millions of others heading home for the holidays. Children can sleep in the backseat during early morning hours, making the trips less taxing on youngsters. Less time spent in traffic can also conserve fuel, saving drivers money.

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Annual PLCB Poster Contest Slated October 11, 2017

In an effort to continue the dialogue about the dangers of underage drinking, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (PLCB) is encouraging students from across the Commonwealth to participate in the 26th annual Alcohol Awareness Poster Contest. The contest is open to all Pennsylvania students in kindergarten through 12th grade, including those who are home-schooled or in private or parochial schools. Students may enter through their schools, clubs, Scout troops, or individually.

Data shows that alcohol exposure and trial are starting younger and younger, with children as young as age 8 trying a drink and even drinking on a somewhat regular basis. It is important for parents and educators to begin talking with children early and often about alcohol, and this poster contest is a fun and creative way to begin those conversations.

Entries must feature a clear no-use message about underage drinking and may be created using any artistic medium. Students are encouraged to use positive messages and images, such as the benefits of being alcohol free or alternatives to underage drinking.

Each year, approximately 50 posters are selected by a panel of judges for recognition. Each artist who creates a selected poster will be notified of his or her accomplishment and invited to attend a recognition ceremony in Harrisburg in April 2018, which is Alcohol Awareness Month.

Several students will receive $100, and one student from each grade (K-12) will receive $50. Some of the winning designs may be reproduced in various formats and distributed across Pennsylvania.

Entries must be postmarked no later than Friday, Nov. 17. For additional information about submission dates, guidelines, and prizes, readers may review the contest guidelines and entry form available at www.lcb.pa.gov under Education, then Poster Contest. Questions about the contest may be directed to 717-772-1432 or ra-lbeducation@pa.gov.

New this year, the PLCB is also providing a sample lesson plan, which educators are encouraged to use in guiding and teaching students about the dangers of underage drinking.

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Teal Pumpkin Project Posted October 11, 2017

If people see teal-colored pumpkins this Halloween, they are not just for decoration. They are a welcome sign for children with food allergies. Ghosts, goblins, and other trick-or-treaters can find safe, alternative treats at houses with a teal pumpkin.

The Teal Pumpkin Project is designed to raise awareness for children with food allergies and promotes inclusion of all trick-or-treaters. Halloween can be a tricky time of the year for some children who deal with specific food allergies.

There is no way to guarantee a child will not come in contact with their allergen while trick-or-treating, making many candies off limits. The Teal Pumpkin Project aims to create a way for children who have allergies to also enjoy the holiday.

The color teal is bright and easily spotted. Teal is also the designated color of food allergy awareness. The color has brought awareness to food allergies for more than 20 years.

Fun, non-food treats may be enjoyed long after Halloween has passed. Options like Halloween pencils or erasers may be used at school or home long after the candy disappears. Glow sticks, small toys, spider rings, and stickers can also provide year-round fun.

People can support the Teal Pumpkin Project by placing a teal-colored pumpkin or Teal Pumpkin Project sign in their yard. The sign indicates that the resident will hand out non-food treats as an alternative to candy. People can still hand out candy, but they should just be sure to separate the treats and allow trick-or-treaters to choose which they would like.

The Teal Pumpkin Project has been organized by the Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) organization since 2014. It offers free, printable Teal Pumpkin Project signs at www.foodallergy.org/education-awareness/teal-pumpkin-project/free-resources.

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County Residents Meet Billion-Step Goal October 10, 2017

The Chester County commissioners and the Chester County Health Department recently reached their goal of county residents walking 1 billion steps before the end of the year. In April, during National Public Health Week, Chester County launched a challenge, the WalkWorks ChesCo! program. County residents recorded more than 1 billion steps in just six months - three months earlier than the challenge deadline.

WalkWorks ChesCo! is a program intended to promote healthier lifestyles, educate county residents, and empower them to adopt healthier lifestyles one step at a time. The program aims to create more places for walking, support and promote walking groups, and coordinate walking challenges. It also features a website that has allowed participants to track their steps as they worked toward the countywide goal. The tracking system at www.chesco.org/walkworks syncs with most devices and mobile apps that already track steps, and it also allows users to convert other physical exercise into steps to be manually added.

During one of the commissioners' public sunshine meetings, county residents celebrated the fulfillment of their goal. Joining the commissioners and health department officials were community organizations and partners who contributed to the challenge, including staff and students from North Coventry Elementary School and a representative from Activate Phoenixville Area.

Chris Mitchell, health and physical education teacher at North Coventry Elementary School, was one of the many educators who took up the WalkWorks ChesCo! challenge by developing a program for students, teachers, and staff to walk many steps in the week leading up to Chester County Walks Day, Sept. 23. With the support of school principal Dr. Susan Lloyd, Mitchell led a team and set a school and community goal of walking 10 million steps in just one week.

By the end of the week, North Coventry Elementary School students, staff, parents, friends, and community first responders had surpassed the original goal, walking more than 14 million steps. In total, Chester County schools walked 25 million steps in the week leading up to Chester County Walks Day.

The WalkWorks ChesCo! program is Chester County's response to the national Healthiest Cities and Counties Challenge, a two-year competition that encourages U.S. cities and counties to create a positive health impact. Chester County Commissioner Terence Farrell became aware of the Healthiest Cities and Counties Challenge in 2016 and tasked county staff to apply. The county was selected out of 400 applications as one of 50 members of the national HealthyCommunity50 and, as such, received $10,000 in community seed funds to establish the WalkWorks ChesCo! program.

Staff in the Chester County Health Department will assess the success of the program's first 1 billion steps and until December will review the methods for promoting more steps in 2018.

If judged the most successful Healthiest Cities and Counties Challenge program, Chester County will receive $500,000, which will be used to further enhance health programs for all county residents. The Healthiest Cities and Counties Challenge is a partnership established between the Aetna Foundation, the American Public Health Association, and the National Association of Counties.

For more information about the WalkWorks ChesCo! program and to register, readers may visit www.chesco.org/walkworks.

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Fire Prevention Week Slated October 9, 2017

In a typical home fire, individuals may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. That is why home escape planning is critical in a fire situation. It ensures that everyone in the household knows how to use that small window of time wisely.

This year's Fire Prevention Week is themed "Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!" and works to better educate the public about the importance of developing a home escape plan and practicing it. Warwick Emergency Services Commission (WESC) is working in coordination with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of the Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years, to reinforce those potentially lifesaving messages. Fire Prevention Week will continue through Saturday, Oct. 14.

In support of Fire Prevention Week, WESC encourages all households to develop a plan together and practice it. A home escape plan includes working smoke alarms on every level of the home, in every bedroom, and near all sleeping areas. It also includes two ways out of every room, usually a door and a window, with a clear path to an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole, or mailbox) that is a safe distance from the home.

NFPA and the WESC offer additional tips and recommendations for developing and practicing a home escape plan.

Families should draw a map of their home with all members of the household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit.

Families should practice a home fire drill twice a year. It is a good idea to conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in the home and to practice using different ways out.

Parents should teach children how to escape on their own in case adults cannot help them.

Families should make sure their house number is clearly marked and easy for the fire department to find.

Doors should be closed when leaving a room, as this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire.

Once families make it outside, they should stay outside. Individuals should never go back inside a burning building.

Local residents may stay updated with local emergency services by visiting the Facebook pages of WESC, Lititz Fire Company No. 1, Brunnerville Fire Company, Rothsville Fire/Ambulance Company 24, Brickerville Volunteer Fire Company, Warwick Community Ambulance Association, and Northwest EMS. To learn more about this year's Fire Prevention Week campaign and home escape planning, readers may visit www.firepreventionweek.org.

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"Go-Live" To Encourage Healthful Lifestyles October 6, 2017

Hope Within Ministries is teaming up with several area businesses and organizations to present "Go-Live" to the community on Thursday, Oct. 26, at Cornerstone Youth Center, 95 S. Wilson Ave., Elizabethtown. The free, family-friendly wellness event will be open to the public from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Hope Within Ministries president Donita Sturgis said that the organization recently received a grant to use for intentional community health outreach and decided to team up with other area organizations in hopes of maximizing the efforts. "The whole point is to encourage people to go live life more healthfully," Sturgis explained. "That truly will bring people the most life enjoyment and satisfaction."

"Collectively as organizations we care about the physical, emotional, and spiritual health of individuals in our community," Sturgis shared. "We want to address physical health first, and relaxation ties into that with the ability to manage stress and anxiety." At "Go-Live," professional massage therapists will offer a relaxation station complete with free chair massages and information on additional relaxation techniques.

Registered dietitian Amy Mathew, along with nutrition interns from Penn State University, will present several food tasting stations where attendees may sample items such as fruit smoothies, vegetable smoothies, quinoa dishes, make-and-take trail mix, and more.

Children's activities will include entertainment by a clown, health and fitness games and challenges, and prizes.

Giveaways, including a brand-name blender/nutrition extractor, gift cards for a local farmers market and classes at GEARS, and a professional massage, will also be available for attendees to enter to win. Free cookbooks will also be available while supplies last.

Hope Within Ministries will also offer free flu shots for adults and children, as well as glycohemoglobin and random blood sugar tests. A variety of biofitness screenings will be offered by personal trainer Mark Mueller, including body fat percentages, blood pressure, and resting heart rate. Mueller and other trained individuals will explain what the numbers mean and how they can be improved, if need be.

Sturgis said that Hope Within and the other organizations would like to put a dent in the amount of chronic disease among area residents, thus improving quality of life and decreasing the high medical costs that accompany conditions such as obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes. "If we can work at the root of the problem, hopefully we can take people to a healthier state," said Sturgis, noting that education is a crucial part of addressing and improving health issues.

"There's so much that we can do to impact our health," Sturgis commented. "We're coming together to promote an active and healthy lifestyle as children and adults."

Although the event is free, organizers do request that interested individuals sign up in advance by visiting www.facebook.com/hopewithinministries or by emailing annemarie.mcalester@hopewithin.org.

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