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"Christmas At Salem" Will Offer Gifts Galore October 20, 2017

The children's gift tree will be absent from the 32nd annual Christmas at Salem holiday bazaar, which will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 4, at Salem United Church of Christ (UCC) of Rohrerstown, 2312 Marietta Ave., Lancaster. However, there will be plenty for youngsters to do to get into the spirit of Christmas.

"We will have (Santa's Workshop) - a room for kids to make crafts and decorate cookies," said pastor Laverne DiNino.

Youngsters might also be interested in the used books and DVDs that will be offered for sale.

Of course, there will be lots for adults as well. In addition to the reading materials and movies, there will be nearly 40 crafters and other vendors selling their wares. Items will include crocheted scarves and blankets, jewelry, handmade cards, pillows, wreaths, cheese boards and other wood crafts, fused glass, holiday ornaments, garden decor, Pokemon collectibles, and ceramics. Home-party sellers will offer women's clothing, handbags and totes, hair accessories, papercrafting supplies, and fragrance products. Boy Scout Troop 64, which Salem sponsors, will also have a booth at the bazaar, where Scouts will provide information about Wreaths Across America and accept donations.

A silent auction of select items will run concurrently with the bazaar. A Penn State-themed wreath, a knit shawl, a hand-painted slate, an appliqued wool tablemat, and a slate-roofed birdhouse will be among the items up for bids. Additionally, there will be opportunities to win a queen-size Amish-made quilt.

One aspect that the organizers consider unique to their event is the freshness of the baked goods. Pumpkin and mincemeat pies will be baked at the church the day before the bazaar, and sticky buns will still be coming out of the ovens when the doors open to the public.

"We have quite a following of people who come just for the food," remarked church member Eileen Shipe.

Church cooks will prepare gallons of vegetable beef soup, which may be purchased by the bowl or the quart. One man likes the soup so much that he tries to be first through the doors, large containers in hand, the organizers said.

Other hot foods and baked goods, including breads, cupcakes, brownies, cookies, and cakes, will be available. Church member Shirley Reitz noted that while it is not a baked item, fudge is one of the big sellers from that section of the bazaar.

Proceeds from the bazaar will be used for charitable purposes.

"We have been focusing on Disaster Relief, an organization the UCC supports," DiNino said. "But we tend to give locally. We provide money for emergency (home-heating) fuel. If there's a special project we're undertaking for the church, we'll usually give some there."

Ginny Deaner, who helped to begin the bazaar in 1985, noted that while the items offered at the bazaar have changed through the years from entirely handmade by church members to products crafted by others, the bazaar itself has not lost its purpose. "From the start, it was dedicated to helping others," Deaner said.

For more information about Christmas at Salem, readers may call the church at 717-397-0141.

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"Light The Night" Event Planned October 19, 2017

Light the Night, a free Manheim community event, will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. at two locations: Teen Central, 15 S. Wolf St., and the Town Square.

Each site will offer safe family entertainment, including children's games, face painting, skits, snacks, and a hayride.

For more information, call Diane at 717-665-2631 or Veronica at 717-664-2990.

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Wrightsville AOG To Host Fall Fest October 18, 2017

The heart behind Wrightsville Assembly of God's (AOG) annual Community Fall Fest is to love the community with no strings attached, explained pastor Aaron McNatt. "This is the fifth year and the event has really grown, but the vision has stayed the same," reflected McNatt. "Halloween is the one night of the year that the neighbors are actually walking around and knocking on your door, so we said, 'Let's turn the lights on, and let's throw a party.'"

Area residents are invited to wear costumes - or not - and drop in at Wrightsville AOG, 365 Orange St., Wrightsville, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 31, for an evening of free food and activities.

Outdoor activities will include a bounce house and an inflatable slide, carnival games with prizes, a car bash, a petting zoo, hayrides, cake walks, and more. New for this year will be a bicycle obstacle course set up by a local bicycle shop. The shop will provide bicycles of various sizes for youths to ride as they navigate the challenge.

Inside the church, volunteers will serve hot dogs, homemade soup, snacks, baked goods, and beverages. The Rotary Club of Eastern York County will also offer french fries. All of the food is free.

More than 700 people have attended the event in recent years, and McNatt said that many families stop in before, during, or after their regular trick-or-treating route. "Our church family gets excited about the opportunity each year, and volunteers come out by the dozens to make sure it's a fun, safe, and memorable night for all the families," stated McNatt. "Most of the games are geared toward the children, but guests of all ages come out to enjoy the festive atmosphere."

The growth of the Community Fall Fest mirrors the growth that the Wrightsville AOG congregation has seen as a whole in recent years. Prior to McNatt's installment as pastor in 2013, church membership had dwindled to approximately 30 individuals who were eager for revitalization.

The church added events such as Fall Fest, an Easter outreach, and a Christmas Eve service, while also being intentional about partnering with traditions that have already been established in the Wrightsville community for years. The church plays a part in the town's annual Christmas tree lighting and hosts students from Wrightsville Elementary School for a weekly Released Time program.

The building underwent a physical transformation, beginning with an upstairs renovation in 2014 to expand the children's ministry space. "We did that in faith, because at that time we had no kids and no one to lead a kids' ministry, but as we started moving that way all of the pieces started coming together," McNatt recalled. Exterior doors were replaced and the foyer was renovated in 2015 to create a cafe atmosphere designed to help people connect, said McNatt. Finally, at the end of 2016, renovations were completed on the sanctuary.

Another change at Wrightsville AOG was hiring staff members beyond a lead pastor for the first time in its history. The church welcomed Valerie McClure as secretary in 2015 and Chris Merrill as connections pastor in 2016.

The children's ministry has seen tremendous growth in the past few years, and overall church attendance has increased so much that a second service time was recently added to make room for even more growth. Wrightsville AOG launched its new service times at 9 and 11 a.m. on Oct. 8. "We set a new record for attendance, so that was a nice confirmation," remarked McNatt. "But more than the size of it, what's exciting to me is the health of it and the direction that it's going. If you focus on the health, growth will follow. We are right here in the community, and we want to have a positive impact."

For more details, readers may visit www.wrightsvillechurch.com or call 717-252-3623.

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Winter Weather Vehicle Tips October 18, 2017

Winter weather causes many people to retreat indoors until the spring thaw. However, for those who embrace the cooler temperatures or find that life must go on despite snow and ice, taking inventory of their vehicles is a must before the first snowflakes start to fall.

Tire care is an especially important area of vehicle maintenance. Tire experts say that regular tires may be ineffective for winter driving. Summer tires are made from materials that are optimized for warm conditions. When the mercury drops, these same materials can harden, reducing their ability to grip the road. That lack of traction can be compounded by the presence of snow or ice. Even all-season tires, which are designed to be driven year-round, can be insufficient in severe weather conditions. Winter tires can help drivers safely navigate winter roadways.

Having the right snow tires matters when driving in winter weather conditions. It is important to look for tires that can disperse water sufficiently and also grip the road. Snow tires are designed to remain softer and more flexible to conform to the road better in cold conditions. Some winter tires are even studded to provide better traction.

Unfortunately, even the best winter tires cannot provide perfect traction on slippery roadways. That is why it is essential, in conjunction with the use of winter tires or snow chains, to modify driving techniques to navigate safely.

Drivers should slow down on winter roads. Drivers should also allow a greater distance for stopping than for dry conditions. Slippery conditions can make it more challenging to stop, and excessive speeds can make the situation worse.

Drivers should shift into low gear. On hills, drivers can rely on low gears to maximize traction to travel up and down hills. This can minimize skids or sliding.

The vehicle should receive a tune-up. In addition to tires, drivers should be sure the braking system, battery, and other major components of the vehicle are in good working order.

Windshield wipers should be replaced. Reduced visibility can compromise the safety of drivers and their passengers. Windshield wiper blades should be replaced before winter arrives. Drivers should consider purchasing winter-rated windshield blades.

Drivers should know how to recover from a skid. When skids occur on black ice or slush, drivers should take their feet off of the pedals and steer gently in the direction they want to go. As the vehicle regains traction, only then should the brakes or accelerator be applied.

Winter weather requires making some vehicle modifications, and drivers may want to alter the way they drive to be safer on the road.

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Teal Pumpkins Mean Allergy Alternatives October 16, 2017

Northwest EMS Joins Trick-Or-Treat Outreach

For children with food allergies, trick-or-treating can often lose its luster. That is why Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) launched a national effort for Halloween called the Teal Pumpkin Project, an initiative designed to offer options for youths with allergies and for children whose parents who may not want them to be overloaded with sugar.

Northwest Emergency Medical Services (EMS) will be participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project during countywide trick-or-treat hours from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 31. Families are invited to stop in at the stations located at 60 W. Colebrook St., Manheim, and 380 W. Bainbridge St., Elizabethtown, to meet emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics and receive non-candy treats. All are welcome.

Northwest EMS community outreach manager Lori Shenk explained that FARE's mission is to help make sure all children will come home from trick-or-treating with something they can enjoy. "The key is to raise awareness," Shenk said.

Teal pumpkins are already set up outside of each station to indicate participation in the Teal Pumpkin Project, and Shenk encourages area residents to consider taking part in the initiative at their own homes. "Anybody can do the Teal Pumpkin Project," Shenk noted. By displaying a teal-painted pumpkin on Halloween, homeowners are saying that they will offer non-candy treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, to trick-or-treaters. "Lots of households give non-candy items anyway, but the pumpkins are a way for people to know for sure before they go to a house," said Shenk.

Thanks to donations from several area businesses, Northwest EMS will have a free coloring book and piggy bank for each trick-or-treater while supplies last. Each child may also select a few prize items from a large cauldron that will be filled with things like whistles, slime, sticky fingers, and other gadgets and toys. "We had a lot of support from the businesses," Shenk said, noting that Bainbridge farmer Ben Burkholder donated the pumpkins and straw that have been used to decorate the station porches.

Shenk also gave teal pumpkins to 25 local businesses to display during October in hopes of getting the word out to more people about what the project is and the fact that the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations will be open to trick-or-treaters. "I have had a lot of feedback from the businesses saying that people are asking about the pumpkins," Shenk shared. "We hope to do this every year on Trick or Treat, so you'll see pumpkins at our stations next year, too."

Northwest EMS serves more than 55,000 residents in 15 municipalities in Lancaster, Lebanon, and Dauphin counties, said Shenk. In addition to the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations, Northwest EMS operates stations in the East Donegal Township municipal building and the Brickerville Fire Department.

According to Shenk, Northwest EMS prioritizes community outreach by intentionally partnering with other groups that provide education, prevention, and wellness services. Aside from the Teal Pumpkin Project, some of the organization's other education partnerships include Cribs For Kids safe sleep education in partnership with Penn State Children's Hospital; Farm and Home Safety Education with Lancaster General Health Trauma Services and Penn State Extension Services; Concussion Awareness and Education with the American Trauma Society and PA Safe Kids; CPR, Hands-Only CPR, and first aid with the American Heart Association; Toys for Tots collection with the United States Marine Corps Reserve; Teen Safe Driving and Distracted Driving education with local emergency response agencies; and an annual food bank collection with local food banks.

To learn more, readers may call Shenk at 717-371-8282 or visit www.nwems86.org.

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Teal Pumpkins Mean Allergy Alternatives October 13, 2017

Northwest EMS Joins Trick-Or-Treat Outreach

For children with food allergies, trick-or-treating can often lose its luster. That is why Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) launched a national effort for Halloween called the Teal Pumpkin Project, an initiative designed to offer options for youths with allergies and for children whose parents who may not want them to be overloaded with sugar.

Northwest Emergency Medical Services (EMS) will be participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project during countywide trick-or-treat hours from 6 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 31. Families are invited to stop in at the stations located at 60 W. Colebrook St., Manheim, and 380 W. Bainbridge St., Elizabethtown, to meet emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics and receive non-candy treats. All are welcome.

Northwest EMS community outreach manager Lori Shenk explained that FARE's mission is to help make sure all children will come home from trick-or-treating with something they can enjoy. "The key is to raise awareness," Shenk said.

Teal pumpkins are already set up outside of each station to indicate participation in the Teal Pumpkin Project, and Shenk encourages area residents to consider taking part in the initiative at their own homes. "Anybody can do the Teal Pumpkin Project," Shenk noted. By displaying a teal-painted pumpkin on Halloween, homeowners are saying that they will offer non-candy treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, to trick-or-treaters. "Lots of households give non-candy items anyway, but the pumpkins are a way for people to know for sure before they go to a house," said Shenk.

Thanks to donations from several area businesses, Northwest EMS will have a free coloring book and piggy bank for each trick-or-treater while supplies last. Each child may also select a few prize items from a large cauldron that will be filled with things like whistles, slime, sticky fingers, and other gadgets and toys. "We had a lot of support from the businesses," Shenk said, noting that Bainbridge farmer Ben Burkholder donated the pumpkins and straw that have been used to decorate the station porches.

Shenk also gave teal pumpkins to 25 local businesses to display during October in hopes of getting the word out to more people about what the project is and the fact that the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations will be open to trick-or-treaters. "I have had a lot of feedback from the businesses saying that people are asking about the pumpkins," Shenk shared. "We hope to do this every year on trick-or-treat, so you'll see pumpkins at our stations next year, too."

Northwest EMS serves more than 55,000 residents in 15 municipalities in Lancaster, Lebanon, and Dauphin counties, said Shenk. In addition to the Manheim and Elizabethtown stations, Northwest EMS operates stations in the East Donegal Township municipal building and the Brickerville Fire Department.

According to Shenk, Northwest EMS prioritizes community outreach by intentionally partnering with other groups that provide education, prevention, and wellness services. Aside from the Teal Pumpkin Project, some of the organization's other education partnerships include Cribs For Kids safe sleep education in partnership with Penn State Children's Hospital; Farm and Home Safety Education with Lancaster General Health Trauma Services and Penn State Extension Services; Concussion Awareness and Education with the American Trauma Society and PA Safe Kids; CPR, Hands-Only CPR, and first-aid with the American Heart Association; Toys for Tots collection with the United States Marine Corps Reserve; Teen Safe Driving and Distracted Driving education with local emergency response agencies; and an annual food bank collection with local food banks.

To learn more, readers may call Shenk at 717-371-8282 or visit www.nwems86.org.

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Columbia Crossing To Host Pumpkin Painting October 13, 2017

Columbia Crossing, 41 Walnut St., Columbia, will host pumpkin painting on Saturday, Oct. 21. Attendees are invited to drop in between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Complimentary snacks and beverages will be available.

Susquehanna Heritage will provide the supplies. Pumpkins will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, with only one pumpkin per participant.

A suggested donation per participant will be appreciated. Proceeds will benefit the operations and programs of the Columbia Crossing River Trails Center and Susquehanna Heritage.

On Saturday, Dec. 9, an ornament making workshop will be offered from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Attendees will learn to create their own tree decorations from natural materials with some embellishments. They may also create intricate paper snowflakes to hang in their window and learn about historic holiday traditions.

Readers with questions may contact Hope Byers, Columbia Crossing manager, at hbyers@susquehannaheritage.org or 717-449-5607, ext. 1, or Allison Aubrey, Columbia Crossing program coordinator, at aaubrey@susquehannaheritage.org or 717-449-5607.

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Harvest Lancaster Will Host Fall Fest October 12, 2017

Harvest Bible Chapel Lancaster, 609 Prospect St., Lancaster, is bringing back its Fall Fest. The free event will be held on Friday, Oct. 27, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the parking lot behind the church.

According to Brian Bitler, director of strategic advancement, Fall Fest had been held for at least a half-dozen years until 2011, when a change in ministry focus put the event on hiatus.

"We had introduced Camp Rock (a high-energy, high-impact weeklong music and arts camp for school-age children)," Bitler explained. With Camp Rock well-established, and with church attendance practically doubled since 2011, Fall Fest was added to the church's calendar. "We wanted an event for families in our church to be together, to reach out to the community, and to say 'thank you' to our neighbors," Bitler said. "As the church grows, we want to be purposeful that activities aren't just about us. We want to create safe, inviting spaces where our congregation members can invite their neighbors and engage with their community."

"It's an opportunity for us to serve together," added Tammi Nolt, assistant to senior pastor Jerry Lingenfelter.

Nolt noted that numerous small groups, families, and individuals have signed up to staff the event. The volunteers will run carnival games, hand out candy and small prizes, provide face painting, keep recorded music playing, and serve cotton candy, popcorn, coffee, hot chocolate, and other refreshments. Church members will also host a cookie walk and drawings for door prizes, which will include theater tickets and passes to local attractions.

Fall Fest will be geared toward preschool and elementary-age children and their families. There will be no charge for any part of the event. A Facebook event has been created, and readers may click on the Event tab at www.facebook.com/HarvestLancaster to view the details and share it with their friends. Folks may also visit www.harvestlancaster.org/fallfest or call the church office at 717-393-9600.

Harvest Lancaster was founded in 1998 as NewSong Fellowship Church. On March 31, 2013, it formally changed its name to reflect its affiliation with the Harvest Bible Chapel network of churches. Harvest Lancaster strives to offer bold Bible teaching and engaging worship, and it is committed to planting churches. The congregation is a member of the Great Commission Collective and is currently coaching six churches in the Mid-Atlantic region as they move through the process of being planted to establishing an elder board.

"The Great Commission Collective gives us opportunities to network, encourage, grow, and plant churches faster than doing it by ourselves," Bitler said.

Harvest Lancaster also has a campus in Myerstown. Worship services at the Lancaster campus are held at 8:30 and 10:45 a.m. on Sundays. A nursery and children's classes for youths up through fifth grade are available during both services. Folks may learn more about the church or watch the services live online at www.harvestlancaster.org.

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Teal Pumpkin Project Posted October 11, 2017

If people see teal-colored pumpkins this Halloween, they are not just for decoration. They are a welcome sign for children with food allergies. Ghosts, goblins, and other trick-or-treaters can find safe, alternative treats at houses with a teal pumpkin.

The Teal Pumpkin Project is designed to raise awareness for children with food allergies and promotes inclusion of all trick-or-treaters. Halloween can be a tricky time of the year for some children who deal with specific food allergies.

There is no way to guarantee a child will not come in contact with their allergen while trick-or-treating, making many candies off limits. The Teal Pumpkin Project aims to create a way for children who have allergies to also enjoy the holiday.

The color teal is bright and easily spotted. Teal is also the designated color of food allergy awareness. The color has brought awareness to food allergies for more than 20 years.

Fun, non-food treats may be enjoyed long after Halloween has passed. Options like Halloween pencils or erasers may be used at school or home long after the candy disappears. Glow sticks, small toys, spider rings, and stickers can also provide year-round fun.

People can support the Teal Pumpkin Project by placing a teal-colored pumpkin or Teal Pumpkin Project sign in their yard. The sign indicates that the resident will hand out non-food treats as an alternative to candy. People can still hand out candy, but they should just be sure to separate the treats and allow trick-or-treaters to choose which they would like.

The Teal Pumpkin Project has been organized by the Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) organization since 2014. It offers free, printable Teal Pumpkin Project signs at www.foodallergy.org/education-awareness/teal-pumpkin-project/free-resources.

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Farm Show Results Posted October 11, 2017

Showing animals at the New Holland Fair is an effort that sometimes inspires friends and family to become involved, according to a few of the ELANCO School District students who showed goats at the 2017 event.

Sarah Shirk, who currently serves as vice president of Grassland FFA, said that she started showing animals after her older sister, Sam, got involved with 4-H around age 9. Alexandria O'Neill got involved after becoming friends with Shirk. "There was a kind of a chain effect," said Alexandria's younger sister, Abby, who along with younger brother, Tom, showed goats this year.

According to the students, there are benefits and drawbacks to raising goats for show. Alexandria cited the experience and learning about agriculture as highlights, and Tom added that he enjoyed learning about the responsibility involved with raising a goat. Taking part in FFA and 4-H also stood out for Alexandria. "You make some good friends," she said.

Challenges of raising goats involve keeping the goats clean and properly corralled, along with controlling them in the ring, where a collar and lead are used to encourage cooperation. According to Sarah, goats are stubborn, so they can be tricky to work with. "The main thing is ... making them look nice for the show, and making sure you have a good clean cut on them," said Alexandria.

Alexandria added that keeping the goats in their pens can also be an interesting venture. "We have had some escape artists," she noted, and Abby added, "They're very curious. They like to roam around."

Mikayla Horst noted that goats being shown must have been born during that calendar year. She said that she got her two goats in January. Other students acquired their goats as late as March. Sarah explained that goats fare best in groups, so each entrant usually raises at least two. "It's good for them to have a buddy," she said.

The 2017 sheep and goat shows held at the New Holland Fair on Oct. 5 were chaired by Bob Lauffer. Cheryl Davis served as judge.

Jeremiah Snyder was the only exhibitor for breeding sheep. He exhibited Shropshire sheep. Snyder's ram lamb, yearling lamb, and ewe lambs all took first place, as did his yearling ewe, aged ewe, and pair of breeding sheep. Snyder's flock and breeder's young flock also earned first-place ribbons. The champion ram was Snyder's yearling, and the champion ewe was his ewe lamb. Grand champion honors went to his yearling ram and reserve champion to his ewe lamb.

In the class one market lambs, first place went to Abby Reiff, second to Timothy Martin, and third to Lydia Best. Class two market lamb winners included Jenna Wetzel in first place, Jena Smith in second, and Eric Zimmerman in third. The class three pairs of market lambs category was won by Snyder. Zimmerman took second place, and Jordan Wetzel took third.

Class one market goat winners included Mikayla Horst in first place, Anya Fisher in second, and Caleb Martin in third.

Tom O'Neill took first place in class two, followed by Danielle Oberholtzer and Horst.

Class three winners were Trevor Huber in first place, Snyder in second, and Huber's second goat in third.

In class four, Tate Fisher took the blue ribbon. Nicole Martin placed second, and Oberholtzer was third. The grand champion goat belonged to Tate Fisher, and the reserve champion to Huber.

In the intermediate showmanship class, Snyder took first place, followed by Tate Fisher and Nicole Martin. In the beginner class, Oberholtzer earned the blue ribbon, followed by Horst and Alexandria O'Neill. In the novice class, Huber took first, followed by Caleb Martin, and Abby O'Neill.

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Holiday Travel Tips Shared October 11, 2017

For many people, no holiday season is complete without traveling. While traveling might not be as fun a holiday tradition as decking the halls or exchanging gifts with loved ones, there are ways for travelers to make their Christmastime excursions more enjoyable and affordable.

According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 91 percent of holiday travel is done by personal vehicle, such as a car. College students driving home for semester holiday breaks can invite fellow students heading to the same area to share a ride home. Traveling in pairs or groups can make long trips less monotonous and more affordable, as drivers and their passengers can split the cost of fuel and tolls. People can offer to pick up relatives who live along the way to their destinations, so no one has to drive unnecessarily.

Travelers taking to the air or railways for their holiday traveling should try to book their plans as early as possible. The earlier travelers try to book, the more likely they are to get a favorable itinerary. Travel experts vary with regard to when is the best time to book a flight, but travelers who try to book early and are willing to book indirect flights might find the most affordable deals, regardless of how far away from their desired travel date they book their trips.

Drivers can save time and money by packing their own meals when traveling for the holidays. Rest stop eateries tend to be overcrowded during the busy holiday traveling season, and such restaurants may not provide many choices for health-conscious travelers. Bringing along their own meals allows drivers to adhere to their personal diets and eat foods that will not make them drowsy on the road. Drivers can simply eat in the car during stops to assuage hunger.

Traveling during off-peak hours is recommended. Drivers who can muster the energy to begin their trips before sunrise can get a head start on the millions of others heading home for the holidays. Children can sleep in the backseat during early morning hours, making the trips less taxing on youngsters. Less time spent in traffic can also conserve fuel, saving drivers money.

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No-Bake Holiday Dessert Recipe October 11, 2017

The holiday season is synonymous with many things, including delicious foods. While Thanksgiving turkeys or Christmas hams will be found on many a table this holiday season, baked goods and desserts are what many people look forward to this time of year.

Holiday hosts with a lot on their plates might not have the time to prepare homemade baked goods for their guests. Thankfully, the following recipe for Chocolate-Strawberry Pie from Addie Gundry's "No-Bake Desserts" (St. Martin's Press) can be prepared in just 15 minutes, all without turning on the oven.

Chocolate-Strawberry Pie (Yields 1 pie)

Ingredients:

1 pint fresh strawberries, washed, trimmed and halved

1 store-bought (or homemade) chocolate cookie pie crust

2/3 cup sugar

1/4 cup cornstarch

2 T. unsweetened cocoa powder

1/4 tsp minced crystallized ginger

1/8 tsp ground nutmeg

Pinch of kosher or sea salt

6 large egg yolks

2 1/2 cups half-and-half

6 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped

1/2 T. rum extract

1 tsp vanilla extract

Additional strawberries for garnish (optional)

Directions:

1. Place the strawberry halves in a single layer in the bottom of the pie crust.

2. In a medium saucepan, whisk together the sugar, cornstarch, cocoa powder, ginger, nutmeg, and salt over medium heat.

3. Whisk in the egg yolks to create a thick paste. Gradually whisk in the half-and-half until the mixture thickens, about 5 minutes. Bring to a boil and cook for 1 minute. Remove from the heat.

4. Add the chocolate and whisk until combined. Add the rum and vanilla extracts. Cool the mixture for 4 minutes.

5. Pour the filling over the strawberries and up to the top of the crust. Chill the pie for 2 hours or until set.

6. Garnish with additional strawberries, if desired.

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Corn Maze Proclaims "Amazing Grace" October 9, 2017

When the time came to choose a phrase for the fourth annual corn maze at Jerusalem Church in Manheim, the decision was a bit trickier than in years past. "The first message we chose was 'God Loves.' Because of this, we decided to continue with the Trinity for years two and three," explained Angie Havice, who serves on the church's family ministry events team. "Jesus Saves" and "Spirit Leads" were the corn maze phrases the past two years, and this year the planning team spent a lot of time brainstorming and consulting with the crew of volunteers who construct the maze to see what might work. "We wanted to create a message that was meaningful but also possible to execute," Havice said.

They landed on "Amazing Grace," a well-known hymn and phrase that reflects the John 1:14 description of Jesus as being full of grace and truth, along with John 1:16, which says, "For from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace." Jerusalem Church's mission is to "lead people to find their greatest joy and pleasure in Jesus Christ above all things to the glory and worship of God."

"When we break down our mission, (it) is to draw attention to Jesus Christ and make His name famous," summed up Havice. "We feel this message, 'Amazing Grace,' combined with our Scripture focus of John 1:14-17, is a unique way to draw attention to Jesus Christ and make His name famous."

Ray Gruber serves as the corn expert, monitoring the corn's growth. "Because no one can predict the rate of growth, we must be ready to move when the corn is ready," explained Havice. On June 25, it was determined that the maze should be created within the next few days, so a group of volunteers gathered at the church on June 28 to get to work. "We had a large group helping to create the maze this year, which is a good thing since it is the longest maze to date," Havice remarked.

The crew included Chad Eberly; Kevin Havice; Bruce Becker; Mark Gleason; Mary Gruber; Marcia Eisenhooth; Heather Johnson; John Kassab; Eugene and Janice Saylor; Katie, Gabe, Lilly, and Mac Thompson; Val Shirk; Mandi, Karise, and Karlee Benson; Stacy, Jade, Sage, and Clay Eberly; and Ed Eisenhooth.

The corn maze, which is approximately a half-mile, will be open for the public in conjunction with a Disguise and Prize event on Saturday, Oct. 14, at the church, 1620 Newport Road, Manheim, from 1 to 4 p.m. The free community event is open to children and families.

Disguise and Prize is a fall activity that allows children in costume to walk around to different decorated vehicles in the church parking lot to receive small prizes such as candy, stickers, and trinkets. "Our goal is to offer prizes that are both edible and non-edible. So there will be candy, but hopefully not candy overload," Havice said.

Activity stations with various games and crafts will also be set up in the parking lot.

Free popcorn, hot dogs, bottled water, coffee, and hot chocolate will be available.

Approximately 235 people attended last year's event. "Last year we were blessed by such a warm, beautiful fall day," recalled Havice. "We joked that 2016 was the first time we were giving away hot chocolate and very few people drank it because it was so warm. We are ordering lots of hot chocolate for 2017 and hoping for the exact same results!"

In the case of rain, the event will be held on Sunday, Oct. 15.

For more information, readers may call 717-665-6565 or visit www.jerusalemchurch.net.

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Corvette Club To Host GM Car Show October 9, 2017

Lancaster County Corvette Club (LCCC) president Jan Gerhart of Lancaster purchased an Oldsmobile Cutlass new in 1972.

"I ignored the break-in instructions," Gerhart recalled, referencing the unspoken rule that new vehicles should not be driven faster than 60 mph or driven between 50 to 60 mph for three hours or more for the first few hundred miles. "Within the first 1,000 miles, I took it to 105 mph," Gerhart said.

Somehow, that fast start did not harm the vehicle, as it has accumulated 307,000 miles and still has the original engine.

"It's had eight tops, and it's been painted four times," Gerhart remarked.

LCCC governor Clyde Mooney of Landisville confirmed that the break-in period is not just hearsay. "The computer limits the RPM during the first 500 miles," Mooney said, gesturing to his 2017 Corvette Grand Sport. "It's so you don't burn it out. The engine has to be worn in, and the entire suspension needs to settle."

Since delivery of the Corvette in April, Mooney and his wife have racked up 6,000 miles in the vehicle, including a road trip to Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"It's a car," Mooney commented. "The fun of having it is not looking at it, it's driving it."

Of course, there are occasions when it is appropriate to look at cars, and the LCCC's American Legends people's choice fun show is one such event. This year's show will be held on Sunday, Oct. 22, at Faulkner Chevrolet, 2000 Bennett Ave., Lancaster. Registration will be open from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., and the show will run until 2:30 p.m. Awards will be presented at approximately 3 p.m., and club members will present a check to Clare House of Lancaster, which the LCCC has supported for many years.

While the car show is hosted by a Corvette Club, Mooney stressed that participation is open to all vehicles manufactured or powered by General Motors. While club member Aldie King of Gap owns a Corvette - Corvette ownership is a requirement of membership in the LCCC - he also has a 1946 Chevrolet pickup that is eligible for entry in the show. The pickup has had some changes under the hood, so it is considered custom, and its vibrant paint job also contributes to the designation.

"I didn't like GM's yellow, and I wanted a butter yellow," King said. "We just kept mixing paint until we got the right color."

Last year's show drew 276 registered vehicles. Anticipating similar attendance at the upcoming event, the club has expanded the parking area for exhibits. Spectators, who may attend free of charge, will be directed to a parking lot across the street from the venue.

Trophies will be awarded in 14 classes, and every registered exhibitor will be entered to win a door prize. The first 200 registered vehicles will receive goodie bags and event T-shirts. There is a cost to register, with a discount available through Saturday, Oct. 14.

The show, which will be held rain or shine, will feature a silent auction of many non-automotive items, a Ladies' Oasis offering alternatives to car talk, and music played by a disc jockey. Barbecue and beverages will be available for purchase.

To download a registration form, readers may visit www.lcccpa.com. Folks with questions about the event may call Mooney at 717-371-8964.

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Program To Focus On Butterflies October 9, 2017

A Butterfly Identification Workshop and Walk will be offered on Sunday, June 25, from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Green Valleys Watershed Association (GVWA) at Welkinweir, 1368 Prizer Road, Pottstown.

Staff and naturalists at GVWA will teach participants the basics of butterfly identification and how to support butterflies on attendees' own properties.

Workshop attendees will then practice their identification skills on a walk around Welkinweir's gardens and meadows. Butterfly observations will be recorded as part of a pollinator citizen science initiative. Participants will take home a pocket field guide to Pennsylvania's most iconic butterflies and moths.

The program is funded in part by the Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society and a grant from the Environmental Stewardship Fund under the administration of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation.

Butterflies and other pollinators are in need of increased conservation efforts to support their populations, and thoughtful planning of gardens and open spaces can help to sustain them.

No butterfly identification experience is necessary. Those who attend the workshop are asked to dress for the season and wear sturdy shoes. They are advised to bring binoculars, a camera, and water. The program will begin at Welkinweir's Education Barn; parking will be available in the visitor parking lot off 1368 Prizer Road, approximately 1 mile west of Route 100 just south of Pughtown.

Separate program fees have been set for GVWA members and for nonmembers. Payment is due by the start of the program. The event will be postponed to Saturday, July 1, at 9 a.m. in the event of rain.

To register in advance, readers may contact Kelsey Stanton at kelsey@greenvalleys.org or at 610-469-4900.

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"Namaste Diwali" To Celebrate Festival Of Lights October 6, 2017

When Deepa Balepur, president of the Indian Organization of Lancaster County (IOLC), was growing up in India, the Hindu holiday of Diwali - known as the festival of lights - was highly anticipated.

"Diwali meant two weeks off from school - yay! - helping Mom with cleaning and decorating our home, lighting up diyas - lamps - inside and outside our home, and going shopping for clothes and jewelry," Balepur recalled.

Now as an adult, Balepur views the holiday as a time for celebration with friends, family members, and anyone else who wants to be a part of the festivities. "It is an opportunity to reflect on and engage in the richness of our traditions and heritage," she said. "Homes are filled with rich aromas of mithai - Indian sweets - and gifts are exchanged between family members and close friends. Fireworks are a popular activity too. I've heard Diwali being described as a union of Christmas and (the United States' Independence Day)."

Lancaster County residents and visitors may experience a sample of the holiday celebration during Namaste Diwali, which the IOLC will hold from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 22, at Millersville University's Student Memorial Center, 21 S. George St., Millersville. There is no cost to attend the festival, but some activities will charge a fee, and food will be available for purchase. A cultural program featuring dance, music, and magic will be held at 2 p.m., in the SMC's multipurpose room. Due to limited space in the room, reservations are suggested and may be made by visiting http://goo.gl/gv8TNo.

"Local magician and illusionist Brett Myers is creating a unique show, 'The Wonder of Diwali,' fusing amazing comedy, music, and magic with the best of the festive spirit to take our audience on a journey of joy, hope, and wonder," Balepur said.

The activities available during the festival will include henna artistry, arts and crafts stations representing different regions of the Indian subcontinent, chess games, T-shirt designs, and more.

"A very popular activity is the decorating of diyas," Balepur remarked. "A diya signifies hope, good will, and knowledge."

A cultural enrichment workshop will teach guests how to wear a traditional sari and to play an Indian drum called a "tabla."

Vendors will sell colorful clothing, jewelry, and decor in an on-site bazaar.

Food offerings will include vegetarian and non-vegetarian meals cooked in Indian spices, herbs, and roots, and there will be a display of roadside snacks from throughout India.

To learn more about the event, readers may visit www.iolcpa.org/events. Walk-ins are welcome, but registration is preferred for planning purposes. Readers may register by emailing admin@iolcpa.org with the number of individuals attending.

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MOPW Group Plans Turkey Dinner October 4, 2017

The Middle Octorara Presbyterian Women (MOPW) will host a turkey dinner at Middle Octorara Presbyterian Church (MOPC), 1199 Valley Road, 4 miles east of Quarryville, from 4 to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 14. For the price of admission, diners will be treated to all they care to eat of turkey breast, bread filling, mashed potatoes, gravy, corn, pepper cabbage, cranberry sauce, rolls and butter, and pies. Coffee and hot tea will be included as well.

Takeout meals will also be available, and a drive-through line will be set up around the church.

"I think (dinner coordinator Shirley Miller) said we have 100 preorders already," remarked MOPW member Linda Farmer.

The turkey dinner has been a popular event for the church, and it is the largest fundraiser for the MOPW. The proceeds will be used by the group to support local missions and meet needs in the community.

"It's an economical meal for all you can eat," said MOPW member Nancy Harnish.

"It's good, homemade food," added MOPW member Marlene Fromm. "Most of the pies are homemade too."

The food is not the dinner's only draw. Served in the church's fellowship hall, the meal offers plenty of opportunities for socializing.

"People can come and see people they haven't seen in a while," Harnish commented.

MOPW members and other folks will gather at the church at 10 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 13, to prepare for the following day's dinner. Anyone who would like to help is welcome. Peeling 200 pounds of potatoes is chief among the tasks to complete. The group also needs a strong person or two to lift 50-pound bags of potatoes and to move hot kettles of potatoes from the stove. While the work is somewhat messy, it is a good time. "We laugh and talk," Harnish said.

For more information about the turkey dinner, readers may call Miller at 717-786-3690.

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Food, Farms, And Fun At The Solanco Fair September 29, 2017

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Making Halloween Festivities Safer September 27, 2017

Thousands of costume-clad children will embark on treat-finding missions in neighborhoods all across the country this Halloween. Everyone wants their Halloween festivities to be fun, but it is important that trick-or-treaters and their chaperones prioritize safety as well.

Ensuring trick-or-treating youngsters are visible to motorists can make Halloween safer for everyone involved. The American Academy of Pediatrics and other safety groups suggest several strategies for safe trick-or-treating.

Adults should chaperone young trick-or-treaters who are unlikely to be focused on safety in the midst of Halloween excitement. Reflective tape or LED lights should be used to make children more visible. Dark costumes coupled with twilight can make it difficult for motorists to see trick-or-treating youngsters. Parents can improve the chances of their children being seen by motorists by adhering reflective tape onto costumes. Glow sticks and wearable LED lights also can illuminate trick-or-treaters.

Children and/or chaperones who carry flashlights and lanterns can improve their own visibility while also making themselves more visible to motorists. Lanterns and flashlights help trick-or-treaters avoid holes, cracked pavement, and other obstacles. For those children who want to free up their hands for better treat gathering, lights that strap to the head are an option.

Homeowners can do their part by keeping outdoor flood lights and accent lighting on to make paths safer for youngsters on the prowl for Halloween candy.

Parents are encouraged to choose face paint over masks. Children wearing masks may not spot oncoming cars or other hazards. Face makeup will not affect children's visibility but will still help them look scary.

With the right combination of caution and fun, Halloween can be an enjoyable time for youngsters and adults.

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Young Women To Compete For Fair Queen Title September 21, 2017

The West Lampeter Fair Queen contest will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 27, in the main arena at the Lampeter Fairgrounds, 851 Village Road, Lampeter. The competition will be preceded by a parade from Lampeter-Strasburg (L-S) High School to the fairgrounds, beginning at 7 p.m. In addition to numerous duties throughout the year, the 2017 queen will participate in the Pennsylvania State Fair Queen Contest in January 2018.

A total of 11 young women, who have been selected by high school club members and advisers, will compete for the title. The contestants are Greta Bennett, Emily Bishop, Eryn Donnelly, Emily Jones, Mackenzie Krebs, Natalie Ludwig, Megan Mellinger, Arooba Raja, Cheyanne Waller, Claire Warner, and Samantha Williams.

Greta is a senior and the daughter of Kenneth and Lori Bennett of Lancaster. She will represent Student Council. Greta will be escorted by junior Tyler Shoemaker, the son of Janet Maley of Strasburg and Andrew Shoemaker of Peach Bottom.

Emily Bishop is a senior and the daughter of Carsten and Jennifer Bishop of Lancaster. She will represent National Honor Society. Emily will be escorted by senior Dylan Grau, the son of George and Celina Grau of Lancaster.

Eryn is a junior and the daughter of John and Melanie Donnelly of Lancaster. She will represent the Fellowship of Christian Students (FCS). Eryn will be escorted by senior Luke Tordoff, the son of Kevin and Suzanne Tordoff of Lancaster.

Emily Jones is a senior and the daughter of Heath and Wendy Jones of Strasburg. She will represent the L-S Model UN. Emily will be escorted by senior Andrew Fink, the son of Jason and Amie Fink of Lancaster.

Mackenzie is a senior and the daughter of Marshall and Greta Krebs of Strasburg. She will represent Varsity Club. Mackenzie will be escorted by senior Peyton Denlinger, the son of Joseph and Carrie Denlinger of Lancaster.

Natalie is a senior and the daughter of Stephen and Tamara Ludwig of Lancaster. She will represent the Future Nurses Club. Natalie will be escorted by senior Christian Hoke, the son of Tammi Hoke of Willow Street.

Megan is a senior and the daughter of Robert and Nancy Mellinger of Strasburg. She will represent the Garden Spot FFA. Megan will be escorted by junior Dylan Lechner, the son of Pam Lechner of Willow Street.

Arooba is a senior and the daughter of Sunny and Rehana Raja of Strasburg. She will represent the Asian Cultures Club. Arooba will be escorted by senior Alexander Williams, the son of Lisa Salvato and Nick Williams of Lancaster.

Cheyanne is a senior and the daughter of Fred and Lynette Waller of Lancaster. She will represent the L-S Thespian Society. Cheyanne will be escorted by senior Brendan Massar, the son of Brian and Kathleen Massar of Lancaster.

Claire is a senior and the daughter of Scott and Toni Warner of Strasburg. She will represent the Pioneer Page Turners. Claire will be escorted by senior David Medlock, the son of Ronald and Ilse Medlock of Lancaster.

Samantha is a senior and the daughter of James and Sharon Williams of Willow Street. She will represent Pioneer Interact. Samantha will be escorted by senior Matthew Rhoads, the son of Dennis and Susan Rhoades of Strasburg.

For more information about the fair, readers may visit www.westlampeterfair.com.

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