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"Green" Can Be The New Color In Wedding Wear August 1, 2016

Weddings are full of traditions. While some couples may be focused on the time-honored tradition of something old and something new as well as something borrowed and something blue, others may be seeing weddings in an entirely different - and environmentally-friendly - hue: green.

"Green" weddings are on the rise, and couples can embrace various strategies to make their big days more eco-friendly.

· Explore eco-couture designers. Brides need not compromise their eco-conscious ideals for gorgeous designs. Many established and up-and-coming bridal gown designers rely on sustainable materials and practices to craft beautiful gowns. Brides-to-be may not have to look far for a dress that matches their commitment to the environment.

· Consider a vintage gown. Wearing a vintage gown is recycling at its best. Not only will the bride still have her chance to look amazing, but she can breathe new life into a classic wedding dress. Family members can be the first people to seek out when looking for a vintage gown, as one never knows what an aunt or grandmother has in a keepsake chest in the attic. In addition to helping brides save money, wearing a vintage gown can give the person lending the dress a feeling of pride and inclusion in the festivities.

· Guys can don classic attire, too. Grooms-to-be also can embrace vintage attire, or they can borrow a suit or wear a shirt or sentimental item, such as an embroidered handkerchief, from their father or another male relative. If there are few options, renting is certainly a green idea, as a rented tux will be more environmentally friendly than purchasing a tuxedo that may get little use after the wedding.

· Choose sustainable fabrics. Certain fabrics are derived from eco-friendly resources, such as sustainably grown fiber crops or recycled materials. Organic cotton or linen are options, as are many other sustainable textiles. Individuals can purchase fabric and have a tailor or seamstress craft a custom wedding gown or suit, if desired.

· Wear something already in the closet. Couples opting for a casual or civil wedding may have more options with regard to their wedding attire. If the wedding is a less-formal affair, the couple can consider wearing clothes they already own. Such attire is perfectly acceptable, and they won't be ordering new dress clothes and having them shipped that way.

Couples interested in keeping weddings in line with their eco-friendly lifestyles can start with the clothing they wear on their special days.

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How To Make Your Wedding More Eco-Friendly January 5, 2015

Couples about to tie the knot are often preoccupied with finding the right color palettes for their wedding days. While the preferred gamut of hues tends to vary by season, many couples are now looking for ways to "go green" at their weddings in order to make their ceremonies as eco-friendly as possible.

While it might once have been difficult to make weddings environmentally friendly affairs, today's couples have a variety of eco-friendly options at their disposal. From hotels that use solar power to reception halls and caterers that rely on locally sourced foods, there are plenty of ways to turn weddings into entertaining and earth-friendly affairs.

* Reduce reliance on stationery. Couples hoping to be more eco-conscious can cut back on the amount of paper they use at their weddings and throughout the planning process. Invitations can be printed on recycled stock, and couples can avoid using the envelope within an envelope system that is often used when mailing wedding invitations. Furthermore, individuals can easily reduce what is placed inside the invitation, including menu-option cards and travel direction fliers. Have guests visit a website to learn about hotel accommodations and to respond to the wedding invite.

* Choose earth-friendly fabrics. When selecting gowns and other attire, lean toward natural fabrics, such as cotton, wool, hemp, or linen, all of which are eco-friendly fabrics.

* Pick flowers that are in-season. Much like produce, certain flowers are grown out of season with the use of pesticides and herbicides. Imported flowers have high carbon footprints due to the distance often traveled for delivery. Cut down on how far flowers have to travel, as well as on the use of potentially harmful chemicals, by buying locally grown, in-season flowers.

* Encourage guests to carpool. Couples may want to make a flashy entrance at the ceremony, but wedding parties can curb emissions by having as many people travel together as possible. Ditch the sedan or limousine and rent a party bus that can fit guests as well as bridal party members.

* Rethink wedding favors. Instead of trinkets that are produced overseas and likely to end up in the trash, opt for edible favors, seeds or plants, or even donations to charitable organizations.

* Cut down on waste. Are four courses at the reception and a complete dessert display necessary? Food that goes uneaten will likely end up in the garbage. Check to see if an arrangement can be made to deliver leftovers to a soup kitchen or another charitable group. If donation is not an option, scale back the variety of what is served. Chances are guests will not even miss the extra edibles.

* Recycle gold or silver into wedding rings. Wedding bands are customary at wedding ceremonies. Rather than buying new rings, couples can transform old jewelry they already own into unique rings by having the metal melted down and formed into a new piece.

* Nix the elaborate hairstyles. Although many hair products have reduced or eliminated their use of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons), which can enter the atmosphere and damage the ozone layer, harmful chemicals are still used in many products. Brides can skip the elaborate up-do that requires a lot of hair spray for a more natural, free-flowing look.

* Rent or borrow whenever possible. Rented items can be used over and over, while items couples buy specifically for their weddings are liable to be used once and then discarded. Opt for rentals when possible.

* Light beeswax candles. Candles are an eco-friendly way to provide romantic lighting at the wedding. Opt for non-toxic beeswax candles rather than paraffin candles.

When couples put their minds to it, they can find many ways to have an eco-friendly wedding without compromising on either style or fun.

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Going Green On Your Big Day: August 23, 2013

Couples about to tie the knot can make their weddings even more special by making the festivities eco-friendly.

Environmentally friendly ideals are now permeating all aspects of daily living, and couples who already do their best to reduce, reuse, and recycle may want to employ those same values on their wedding day. The growing interest in eco-conscious weddings not only benefits the planet, but also allows couples to set their weddings apart, as eco-friendly aspects can help create unique memories.

Eco-conscious couples can go green in a number of ways before, during, and after their wedding. The carbon footprint of a wedding can be reduced simply by scaling back and avoiding over-consumption. However, there are also easy ways to include green practices in a wedding without compromising on style or statement. Couples won't have to jeopardize their ideals or tastes to achieve a wedding that is both green and beautiful.

Invitations:

One of the easiest ways for a bride and groom to go green while planning their wedding involves the wedding invitations, as couples have many options for eco-friendly invitations. Though many etiquette experts frown on abandoning paper invitations for digital ones, many couples are doing just that. Those who still prefer paper can go green by having their invitations printed on recycled paper or tree-free paper.

Couples can also reduce their other wedding stationary needs by skipping the extra inserts inside of the invitation, such as directions and registry cards. Instead, couples can direct guests to a personal wedding Web page. Many wedding websites offer couples the chance to create their own personal Web page with information about themselves and the wedding ceremony and reception. Couples can post directions, hotel information, and other details that would otherwise be disseminated with the paper invitations. Collecting all of this information on a Web page reduces paper consumption and makes it easier for a couple's guests to find all the pertinent details regarding the big day.

Wedding Attire and Jewelry:

Another way to reduce a wedding's carbon footprint is to reuse and recycle wedding attire and jewelry. A couple's journey to their wedding day typically begins with the marriage proposal and an engagement ring, and even this time-honored tradition can be done in an eco-friendly way. Couples can go green by purchasing vintage or antique engagement rings and wedding bands. Couples can also shop from jewelers that use recycled stones and metals. For a more personal approach, family heirloom jewelry can be used.

Eco-conscious brides can also embrace history when selecting their wedding attire if the bride's mother, grandmother, or other relative has offered her wedding gown. Reusing a wedding dress that has been re-fitted will save the bride money, in addition to conserving the energy that would be needed to construct an entirely new gown. Furthermore, the sentimental gesture of wearing a gown passed down through the generations will be appreciated by the bride's family members and is one way for her to include them in her wedding. Brides can also reuse veils, jewelry, shoes, and other accessories.

Brides who do not have heirloom dresses and accessories to incorporate into their wedding attire can still take an eco-friendly walk down the aisle. In vintage stores, brides can find many styles of dresses and accessories. Additionally, a number of websites match up brides with others looking to swap gently-used items at low or no cost. Brides can also purchase a new gown that is made from sustainable materials. Many top designers now make gowns produced from such materials, leaving brides with a variety of green options.

Beauty:

Brides can also incorporate environmentally friendly products into their wedding day beauty regiment by asking their hairdressers and makeup artists to use all-natural beauty products instead of conventional cosmetics, which may contain toxic chemicals. Brides can also patronize an eco-friendly salon, which are growing in popularity.

Venue:

Eco-friendly wedding options can also extend to the ceremony and reception venues. One of the most affordable and environmentally friendly ways to get married is to simply elope or have a small ceremony. After all, there's no rule that says couples have to invite 300 of their not-so-close friends to the wedding. Opting for more intimate affairs allows couples to save on cost and to help the environment.

For those who do want a larger wedding, keep the event close to home. Couples can wed in a family member's large backyard or in a nearby park to avoid using large, indoor reception halls. Moving the ceremony and party outside can alleviate some environmental impact related to energy usage.

Couples may also look into catering halls that offer packages that include other elements of the wedding, such as flowers, cake, linens, music, and more. These convenient packages may be more affordable and will save the couple the time and gas they would have used driving around to visit different vendors.

Instead of rice, which can be damaging to wildlife, guests may be supplied with bubbles, birdseed, sprinkles, biodegradable confetti, or flower petals to throw at the happy couple after the ceremony.

Flowers:

Flowers add significant aesthetic appeal to a wedding, and couples can make them even more appealing by choosing local flowers that are in season. Local and seasonal flowers do not need to be transported as far as their exotic and out-of-season counterparts.

When shopping for a florist, eco-conscious couples should look for one who specializes in organic flowers, which are never sprayed with potentially harmful pesticides or fungicides. In addition to organic and seasonal flowers, green options include bouquets made of sustainable succulent plants and centerpieces full of organic fruits and wildflowers.

Reception:

Suggestions abound for couples interested in hosting a green reception. Hosting a wedding at or near home gives couples the opportunity to shop around for locally produced, organic foods. Couples may also wish to consider skipping the all-you-can-eat buffet and serving a more traditional meal to reduce the amount of wasted food.

Instead of formal escort cards indicating firm seating arrangements, couples can save paper by allowing guests to choose their own seats from mix-matched options, such as long, communal benches and comfy sofas.

To save money on decorations, couples may decorate with items they already own. Centerpieces and other displays can incorporate the couple's favorite books, photographs, souvenirs, collectibles, and other special items, adding a personal touch to the event's decor. Brides and grooms can also make or purchase banners, garlands, signs, and other decorations that are made from old maps, handkerchiefs, books, and other recycled items.

Another way to make the reception more eco-friendly is to choose a charitable party favor. Instead of giving a party favor that will end up collecting dust on a shelf or sitting in a landfill, couples can give guests organic products or make a donation to a charitable organization in the guests' names.

Transportation:

A major way to reduce the carbon footprint of a wedding is to reduce the transportation-related energy consumption. Carbon emissions can be reduced and fuel can be saved by reducing guests' need to travel far for a wedding and by employing transportation options that can accommodate several people at once, such as a limousine for the wedding party or a party bus to transport guests.

Gifts:

Couples can opt for open registries that enable guests to give everything from eco-friendly housewares to charitable donations or cash for down payments on a home. When giving money, guests do not risk giving the bride and groom something that may be returned or discarded.

Honeymoon:

A couple's dedication to being environmentally friendly can even extend to the selection of a honeymoon destination. Couples can choose from a number of eco-conscious hotels and resorts or elect to honeymoon close to home.

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